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Colors of Nature – Jim Corbett

Summary

Jim Corbet was a great lover of nature. In this extract, he is talking about a dense forest which has not been destroyed by humans. He is taking reader to the top of a hill from where he shows the reader the valley below it. There are foothills (smaller hills under a mountain) down in the valley. There are no trees planted by humans in this forest. The forest is perfectly natural.

Shisham Trees

ShishamAs the seeds of the shisham trees have been washed down the hill, they grow in the foothills. They have a light green color. When these trees mature (grow up) their wood is used for making cartwheels and furniture.

Runi Trees

Runi trees are also green. They bear red berries on them. Runi berries produce a red powder known as kamala. This powder is used in India and in the Middle East to dye wool. Businessmen in the United States used the kamala powder for colorinKamala Treeg butter. They stopped the use of kamala because some greedy men mixed brick-powder with kamala and adulterated it’s quality.

Kamala powder is extracted in a long process. Firstly, the branches of runi trees are cut and the berries are stripped and collected in big baskets. After this the berries are rubbed against the sides of the basket. The powder that gets separated from the berries drift through the cracks of the baskets and it is collected in a cheetal skin or in a squire of clothes.

Khair Trees

Khair treesKhair trees have two important uses: firstly they provide the foothill farmers with ploughshares and secondly these tree support a cottage industry for thousands of people in India – an industry that produces kash or catechu and its by product, khaki.

Analysis
  1. How does the author consider the forests? How do greedy man consider the forests?
    The author, Jim Corbett, believes that trees are the blessings of nature and we should appreciate their beauty and live with them but the greedy men consider them to feed the hunger of their greed and destroy them recklessly/carelessly.
  2. What does the author mean by ‘colors of nature?’
    The author, Jim Corbett, by colors of nature, means that all the trees with their leaves and flowers make the colors of nature.
  3. What do you mean by the “devastating hands of man?”
    Man’s hands are said to be devastating because man has destroyed trees, rivers, air, land, etc.
  4. What kind of forests can escape the destroying hands of men?
    Forests that have trees of no commercial value can escape the devastating hands of greedy men.
  5. How does the author consider the forests? How do greedy man consider the forests?
    The author, Jim Corbett, believes that trees are the blessings of nature and we should appreciate their beauty and live with them but the greedy men consider them to feed the hunger of their greed and destroy them recklessly/carelessly.
  6. What does the author mean by ‘colors of nature?’
    The author, Jim Corbett, by colors of nature, means that all the trees with their leaves and flowers make the colors of nature.
  7. What do you mean by the “devastating hands of man?”
    Man’s hands are said to be devastating because man has destroyed trees, rivers, air, land, etc.
  8. What kind of forests can escape the destroying hands of men?
    Forests that have trees of no commercial value can escape the devastating hands of greedy men.
  9. How do shisham trees take roots? Mention any use of shisham trees.
    Seeds of shisham trees are washed down with the monsoon floods and they grow in the plains. The wood of the shisham tree is used for making cart wheels and furniture.
  10. What are the uses of Runi trees?
    Runi berries produce a red powder known as kamala. This powder is used in India and in the Middle East to dye wool.
  11. What for did the businessmen of the United States use kamala? Why did they stop using it later?
    Businessmen in the United States used the kamala powder for coloring butter. They stopped the use of kamala because some greedy men mixed brick-powder with kamala and adulterated it’s quality.
  12. How is Kamala extracted?
    Kamala powder is extracted in a long process. Firstly, the branches of runi trees are cut and the berries are stripped and collected in big baskets. After this the berries are rubbed against the sides of the basket. The powder that gets separated from the berries drift through the cracks of the baskets and it is collected in a cheetal skin or in a squire of clothes.
  13. What are the uses of Khair trees?
    Khair trees have two important uses: firstly they provide the foothill farmers with ploughshares and secondly these tree support a cottage industry for thousands of people in India – an industry that produces kash or catechu and its by product, khaki.

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