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Adverbs – Added to the Verb!

An adverb is a word describes a verb or action. Take an example – RUN.

You can run in so many manners, at various places, at different time, in different degree and at different frequency:

  • Run FAST (Manner)
  • Run HASTILY (Manner)
  • Run here (Place)
  • Run later (Time)
  • Run always (Frequency)
  • Run carefully (Purpose)

Adverbs of Manner describe how something happens. Where there are two or more verbs in a sentence, adverb placement affects the meaning. Some commonly used adverbs of manner include:

  • Carefully, correctly, eagerly, easily, fast, loudly, patiently, quickly, quietly, well.

Adverbs of Place describe where something happens. Most adverbs of place are also used as prepositions. Some commonly used examples include the following:

  • Abroad, Aboard, Anywhere, Downstairs, Here, Home, in, Nowhere, Out, Outside, Somewhere, There, Underground, Upstairs.

Adverbs of Purpose describe why something happens. Here are some common examples:

  • So, So that, To, In order to, Because, Since, Accidentally, Carefully, intentionally, Purposely.

Adverbs of Frequency describe how often something happens. The following adverbs are commonly used in this way:

  • Always, Ever, Never, Often, Rarely, Seldom, Sometimes, Usually.

Adverbs of Time describe when something happens. These examples are commonly used:

  • After, Already, During, Finally, Just, Last, Later, Next, Now, Recently, Soon, Then, Tomorrow, When, While, Yesterday.

Practice

Adverbs of Manner describe how something happens. Where there are two or more verbs in a sentence, adverb placement affects the meaning. Some commonly used adverbs of manner include:

carefully
correctly
eagerly
easily
fast
loudly
patiently
quickly
quietly
well.

1. Fill in the blanks adverbs from the list above:

  1. The team played ____ and won the match.
  2. Read ___! Haven’t you learnt alphabets.
  3. It cannot be done that ___ as you think. So many people have tried to do it.
  4. Maria listened to him ___ and finally asked him, “Is that all?”
  5. Don’t speak so ___. The child will wake up!

Adverbs of Place describe where something happens. Most adverbs of place are also used as prepositions. Some commonly used examples include the following:

  • Abroad
  • Aboard
  • Anywhere
  • Downstairs
  • Here
  • Home
  • in
  • Nowhere
  • Out
  • Outside
  • Somewhere
  • There
  • Underground
  • Upstairs.

2. Fill in the blanks adverbs from the list above:

  1. I must have met you ___ near the Church. I have a poor memory!
  2. The beggar has been waiting for you ___ the house. Won’t you go out and meet him?
  3. You can’t sit ___ in the park. There are no benches.
  4. They met and fell in love ___ an airplane and married on a ship.
  5. Mr. Davies is not ___. You can meet him in the club.

Adverbs of Purpose describe why something happens. Here are some common examples:

So
So that
To
In order to
Because
Since
Accidentally
Carefully
intentionally
Purposely.

3. Fill in the blanks adverbs from the list above:

  1. Jenny walks ___ to avoid falling.
  2. Bob ___ broke the vase.
  3. He slapped a cop ___ to be arrested by the police.
  4. Study well Myna ___ you can stand second in the class.
  5. The teacher sang a song ___ amuse the children.

Adverbs of Frequency describe how often something happens. The following adverbs are commonly used in this way:

  • Always
  • Every
  • Never
  • Often
  • Rarely
  • Seldom
  • Sometimes
  • Usually.

4. Fill in the blanks adverbs from the list above:

  1. ___ listen to the voice of your conscience.
  2. She ___ wondered whom she could have married if we hadn’t met in the war.
  3. ___ a little rebuke is good for children like you.
  4. I could ___ think of fooling a customer therefore I have a large number of satisfied customers.
  5. __ I like rains but today I didn’t welcome it.

Adverbs of Time describe when something happens. These examples are commonly used:

  • After
  • Already
  • During
  • Finally
  • Just
  • Last
  • Later
  • Next
  • Now
  • Recently
  • Soon
  • Then
  • Tomorrow
  • When
  • While
  • Yesterday.

5. Fill in the blanks adverbs from the list above:

  1. I will meet you either ___ or the day after.
  2. Tell me the truth ___ or you will always have to feel sorry for it.
  3. We will talk about politics ___. Now let’s worry about people.
  4. ___ shut up, Aysha! You have wasted enough time!
  5. ___ will you tell me the story of Roger Skunk?
Questions for Practice

Fill in the blanks with adverbs of degree

  1. They have ___ done the work. See, what a mess!
  2. She spoke ___ and kept quite after that.
  3. You have cried ___, Roshni. Now stop crying.
  4. For seven hours Aisha thought ___ about her examination and then fell asleep.
  5. She has ___ escaped from the lion and ran to her village.
  6. The church is ___ destroyed. Not a stone is in place.
  7. Your paper is ___ done. You can now go.
  • almost
  • absolutely
  • awfully
  • badly
  • barely
  • completely
  • decidedly
  • deeply
  • enough
  • enormously

Fill in the blanks with adverbs of degree

  • entirely
  • extremely
  • fairly
  • far
  • fully
  • greatly
  • hardly
  • highly
  • how
  • incredibly

Fill in the blanks with adverbs of degree

  • indeed
  • intensely
  • just
  • least
  • less
  • little
  • lots
  • most
  • much
  • nearly

Fill in the blanks with adverbs of degree

  • perfectly
  • positively
  • practically
  • pretty*
  • purely
  • quite
  • rather
  • really
  • scarcely
  • simply

Fill in the blanks with adverbs of degree

  • so
  • somewhat
  • strongly
  • terribly*
  • thoroughly
  • too
  • totally
  • utterly
  • very
  • virtually
  • well

What do you think?

Verbs : Finite and Non-Finite

If Conditionals – If+V1¹, If+V², If+V³